14th Meeting of International Committee on GNSS (ICG-14) 14th Meeting of International Committee on GNSS (ICG-14) 14th Meeting of International Committee on GNSS (ICG-14) 14th Meeting of International Committee on GNSS (ICG-14)

14th Meeting of the International Committee on
Global Navigation Satellite Systems (ICG-14)

14th Meeting of the International Committee on
Global Navigation Satellite Systems (ICG-14)

14th Meeting of the International Committee on
Global Navigation Satellite Systems (ICG-14)

14th Meeting of the International Committee on
Global Navigation Satellite Systems (ICG-14)

Welcome to ICG-14











The International Committee on Global Navigation Satellite Systems (ICG), established in 2005 under the umbrella of the United Nations, promotes voluntary cooperation on matters of mutual interest related to civil satellite-based positioning, navigation, timing, and value-added services. ... The ICG contributes to the sustainable development of the world. Among the core missions of the ICG are to encourage coordination among providers of global navigation satellite systems (GNSS), regional systems, and augmentations in order to ensure greater compatibility, interoperability, and transparency, and to promote the introduction and utilization of these services and their future enhancements, including in developing countries, through assistance, if necessary, with the integration into their infrastructures. The ICG also serves to assist GNSS users with their development plans and applications, by encouraging coordination and serving as a focal point for information exchange.

The International Committee on Global Navigation Satellite Systems (ICG) strives to encourage and facilitate compatibility, interoperability and transparency between all the satellite navigation systems, to promote and protect the use of their open service applications and thereby benefit the global community. Our vision is to ensure the best satellite based positioning, navigation and timing for peaceful uses for everybody, anywhere, any time.

At the "United Nations International Meeting for the Establishment of the International Committee on Global Navigation Satellite Systems (ICG)" held on 1- 2 December 2005 in Vienna, Austria, the ICG was established on a voluntary basis as an informal body for the purpose of promoting cooperation, as appropriate, on matters of mutual interest related to civil satellite-based positioning, navigation, timing, and value-added services, as well as compatibility and interoperability among the GNSS systems, while increasing their use to support sustainable development, particularly in the developing countries. The participants in the meeting agreed on an establishment of the ICG information portal, to be hosted by UNOOSA, as a portal for users of GNSS services.

The United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA) works to promote international cooperation in the peaceful use and exploration of space, and in the utilisation of space science and technology for sustainable economic and social development. ...The Office assists any United Nations Member States to establish legal and regulatory frameworks to govern space activities and strengthens the capacity of developing countries to use space science technology and applications for development by helping to integrate space capabilities into national development programmes.
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India decided to go to space when Indian National Committee for Space Research (INCOSPAR) was set up by the Government of India in 1962. With the visionary Dr Vikram Sarabhai at its helm, ...INCOSPAR set up the Thumba Equatorial Rocket Launching Station (TERLS) in Thiruvananthapuram for upper atmospheric research. Indian Space Research Organisation, formed in 1969, superseded the erstwhile INCOSPAR. Vikram Sarabhai, having identified the role and importance of space technology in a Nation's development, provided ISRO the necessary direction to function as an agent of development. ISRO then embarked on its mission to provide the Nation space based services and to develop the technologies to achieve the same independently.

Throughout the years, ISRO has upheld its mission of bringing space to the service of the common man, to the service of the Nation. In the process, it has become one of the six largest space agencies in the world. ISRO maintains one of the largest fleet of communication satellites (INSAT) and remote sensing (IRS) satellites, that cater to the ever growing demand for fast and reliable communication and earth observation respectively. ISRO develops and delivers application specific satellite products and tools to the Nation: broadcasts, communications, weather forecasts, disaster management tools, Geographic Information Systems, cartography, navigation, telemedicine, dedicated distance education satellites being some of them.

To achieve complete self reliance in terms of these applications, it was essential to develop cost efficient and reliable launch systems, which took shape in the form of the Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV). The famed PSLV went on to become a favoured carrier for satellites of various countries due to its reliability and cost efficiency, promoting unprecedented international collaboration. The Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV) was developed keeping in mind the heavier and more demanding Geosynchronous communication satellites.

Apart from technological capability, ISRO has also contributed to science and science education in the country. Various dedicated research centres and autonomous institutions for remote sensing, astronomy and astrophysics, atmospheric sciences and space sciences in general function under the aegis of Department of Space. ISRO's own Lunar and interplanetary missions along with other scientific projects encourage and promote science education, apart from providing valuable data to the scientific community which in turn enriches science.

Future readiness is the key to maintaining an edge in technology and ISRO endeavours to optimise and enhance its technologies as the needs and ambitions of the country evolve. Thus, ISRO is moving forward with the development of heavy lift launchers, human spaceflight projects, reusable launch vehicles, semi-cryogenic engines, single and two stage to orbit (SSTO and TSTO) vehicles, development and use of composite materials for space applications etc.
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NavIC

NavIC (Navigation with Indian Constellation) – formerly known as IRNSS – is an independent, stand-alone Indian regional navigation system intended to cover India and its surrounds. ...The system can provide positioning accuracy to users comparable or superior to GPS or any other global/regional navigation system. The system is designed to provide position accuracy better than 20 meters (2 σ) and Time accuracy better than ± 20 ns (2 σ) over Indian landmass and a region extending to about 1500km around India. Although in practice, the typical performance of position accuracy less than 10 m is achieved. Apart from that, the use of satellites in geostationary orbit ensures nearly 24 X 7 satellite visibility and service availability compared to an MEO system with multiple, transiting satellites like the GPS.

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